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  • Writer's picturePawsarottis

What Cat Food is Good for Kidney Problems?

If you ask the average veterinarian what cats commonly come to vet clinics for, kidney issues will be at the top of the list. Unfortunately, our feline friends are naturally prone to poor kidney function, especially if they’re older or on a strictly dry food diet. Older cats are more vulnerable to cancers, infections, and diseases that can affect the kidneys, while feeding a kibble-only diet can dehydrate cats and put stress on their kidneys over time.

If your cat is showing signs of kidney dysfunction (frequent urination, excessive water drinking, weight loss, bad breath, dull fur, lack of appetite, weakness, etc.), then it’s a good idea to bring them into the vet as soon as you can. Kidney problems can easily go unnoticed for years until the kidneys start failing, so stay observant for any signs of illness or discomfort in your cat.

If your cat has kidney problems, then your vet may recommend switching them to a low-phosphorus (and possibly low-sodium and/or low-protein) food. This is because damaged kidneys have a hard time getting rid of extra phosphorus. High phosphorus levels can pull calcium out of the bones, making them weak and brittle. Meanwhile, controlling sodium and protein intake can help reduce the workload on the kidneys and balance your cat’s blood pressure.


Thankfully we have plenty of kidney-friendly kitty foods in our store. Generally, any food with a phosphorus level below 0.4% is considered low phosphorus. Most low-phosphorus diets will be in the form of wet food or raw food. It’s hard to find cat kibble that is low-phosphorus because of the way that kibble is cooked and also because of how many carbs are found in kibble. Plus, the rich moisture content of wet and raw food helps to flush your cat’s urinary system and promote toxin removal in a way that kibble can’t.

Without further ado, here's a list of delicious and nutritious low-phosphorus cat foods that you can find on our shelves:

BRAND

FOOD TYPE

PRODUCT

PHOSPHORUS %

Weruva

Wet food (canned)

Classic Cat - Grandma's Chicken Soup

0.12%

My Perfect Pet

Gently cooked (frozen)

Low Phosphorus Chicken Blend

0.13%

Weruva

Wet food (canned)

Classic Cat - Funky Chunky

0.13%

Weruva

Wet food (canned)

Classic Cat - Paw Lickin' Chicken

0.13%

Weruva

Wet food (canned)

Classic Cat - Mideast Feast

0.15%

Open Farm

Wet food (tetrapak)

Rustic Blend - Salmon

0.16%

KOHA

Wet food (pouches)

Pure Shreds - Beef

0.17%

KOHA

Wet food (pouches)

Pure Shreds - Chicken & Salmon

0.17%

KOHA

Wet food (canned)

Pure Shreds - Chicken & Duck

0.18%

KOHA

Wet food (canned)

Minimal Ingredient Stew - Turkey

0.22%

KOHA

Wet food (canned)

Limited Ingredient Pate - Rabbit

0.23%

KOHA

Wet food (canned)

Minimal Ingredient Stew - Chicken

0.24%

Open Farm

Wet food (tetrapak)

Rustic Blend - Turkey

0.28%

Open Farm

Wet food (tetrapak)

Rustic Blend - Chicken

0.28%

Open Farm

Wet food (tetrapak)

Rustic Blend - Beef

0.28%

KOHA

Wet food (canned)

Minimal Ingredient Stew - Duck

0.32%

KOHA

Wet food (canned)

Limited Ingredient Pate - Chicken

0.35%

KOHA

Wet food (canned)

Limited Ingredient Pate - Duck

0.36%

Smallbatch

Raw food (frozen)

Beef Batch

0.40%


The brand with the lowest overall phosphorus levels is Weruva, a Massachusetts-based pet food company that specializes in wet food diets that are gentle on the stomach and nutritious for the whole body. However, brands like KOHA, My Perfect Pet, Open Farm, and Smallbatch offer purrfect kidney-friendly options as well.

We hope this blog post has taken some of the mystery out of low-phosphorus cat foods. If your cat is experiencing kidney issues, remember that you’re not alone–there are ways to keep your furry friend as comfortable and healthy as possible. Our team is here to help you find the best solutions for you and your pet. If you have any questions, please feel free to call us at (707) 595-3357 or pay us a visit at the shop. We can’t wait to speak with you!





References:

“Symptoms of Kidney Failure in Cats.” Carolina Veterinary Specialists, www.huntersville.carolinavet.com/site/huntersville-veterinary-blog/2021/07/30/cat-kidney-failure.


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